Soulless State Creates Poverty and Artificially Inflates Homelessness as a Matter of Policy

I originally posted the following information and commentary upon my Facebook wall…


Owners Assisting Homeless Face $1000 Fines – Occupied RV’s Not Allowed on Private Property:

(Andre’ Gabriel EsparzaProperty owners in rural Oregon who are providing a refuge for families and or friends that were displaced by the region’s housing crisis have been told to stop, cease, and desist.

Renee Glass, a kind woman in the rural area of the county has been voluntarily helping her fellow friends and family in need by opening up her private property to them. They parked their camper along-side her barn and hooked up a temporary water hose, sewer, and an extension cord. Now the tactless county code enforcement division are proving once again that private property is not owned by the individuals. Paying eternal rent on their land is not enough for these controllers, they now say that she is in violation of an unjust county ordinance.

(Read entire article here…)

My Commentary: Please read this article, and perhaps you’ll finally understand how the soulless State creates poverty and artificially inflates homelessness, as a matter of policy. And, the more individuals that are forced into State-run services, the more tax dollars can be poured into said services, the more the agents of the State can be hired to “assist,” and finally, the more the State administrators can rob from the allocated funds.

State Forces People into Homelessness Over Possession of Small Quantities of Cannabis

I originally posted the following information and commentary onto my Facebook wall…


Police Having People Evicted from Homes for Small Amount of Marijuana:

() Police in Washington DC are taking advantage of nuisance abatement laws to target renters and homeowners for possession of tiny amounts of cannabis.

Rajuawn Middleton’s son moved out of her home years earlier, but that did not stop police in the nations capital from raiding her home in a search for guns they allege he was harboring. In fact, in the end, the son was never charged with any crime related to the allegations.

During the raid in March 2014, however, a single joint was found in her possession. As a result she was eventually forced to move out of her home.

(Read entire article here…)

My Commentary: And, once these families are disenfranchised, and forced into homelessness by the State, most will require government “assistance” to get by…

“Government: breaks your leg, offers you a crutch, then says, ‘See, if it weren’t for me, you wouldn’t be able to walk’.”

Does the Phrase, “Poverty is Violence,” Refer to Criminal Violence, or the Seeming Violence of Long-Term Homelessness & Malnutrition?

Upon reading the article, “Poverty is Violence,” by Russel Madden, I engaged in the following debate with the author about his work…

"Poverty is the worst form of violence' Mahatma Gandhi

“Poverty is the worst form of violence’ Mahatma Gandhi

Rayn: I came across your article, “Poverty and Violence,” online in an attempt to find the original author of the quote “Povery is Violence” (it appears to be Ghandi, but I’m still in the process of researching). Anyway, after I had finished reading, I was compelled to write to you. I needed to tell you this: there is absolutely no merit whatsoever in equating the “violence” described in the saying “poverty is violence” with petty crime, or the phrase “poverty is theft.”

This paradoxical saying is simply meant to convey a few simple ideas. Living in hunger is violent because it directly results in physical discomfort, pain and deterioration, and in the worse-case scenarios, dehydration, malnutrition and death; living in homelessness is violent because it exposes you to the harshness of the elements, including frosty winter and snowstorms, rain and thunderstorms, and scorching summer heat. These conditions are known to cause severe physical discomfort, and in the worse-case scenarios, hypothermia, cold and pneumonia, and dehydration. Do you see that pattern that is forming? You can claim that all of these things could be from bad luck, laziness or stupidity, but this meritless generalization, which starts as a possibility, becomes your reason of choice as to why people are trapped in poverty. Also, you define poverty as just at or below the level needed to survive (most definitions actually point to the latter), but then, as if you are writing a whole new article, you later redefine poverty into a much larger group of people: those who have less than the people that have more. This obviously serves to bring home your point that people in poverty are actually just jealous of those with more. However, if we had maintained your first definition, then the “more” that we would be referring to would actually be “food” and “shelter,” not the luxury and comfort items that come to mind when you describe a simple “less vs. more” version of poverty.

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