Never Forget… Institutionalized Eugenics in America

I originally posted the following information and statement onto my Facebook wall…

"Buck v. Bell: In 1925, Virginia, like a majority of states then, enacted eugenic sterilization laws. Viriginia's law allowed state institutions to operate on individuals to prevent conception of what were believed to be 'genetically inferior' children. Charlottesville native, Carrie Buck (1906 - 1983), involuntarily committed to a state facility near Lynchburg, was chosen as the first person to be sterilized under the law. The U.S. Supreme Court, in Buck v. Bell, on 2 May 1927, affirmed the Virginia law. After Buck, mor than 8,000 other Virginians were sterlized before the most relevant parts of the act were repealed in 1974. Later evidence eventually showed that Buck and many others had no 'hereditary defects.' She is buried south of here." (Department of Historic Resources, 2002)

“Buck v. Bell: In 1925, Virginia, like a majority of states then, enacted eugenic sterilization laws. Viriginia’s law allowed state institutions to operate on individuals to prevent conception of what were believed to be ‘genetically inferior’ children. Charlottesville native, Carrie Buck (1906 – 1983), involuntarily committed to a state facility near Lynchburg, was chosen as the first person to be sterilized under the law. The U.S. Supreme Court, in Buck v. Bell, on 2 May 1927, affirmed the Virginia law. After Buck, mor than 8,000 other Virginians were sterlized before the most relevant parts of the act were repealed in 1974. Later evidence eventually showed that Buck and many others had no ‘hereditary defects.’ She is buried south of here.” (Department of Historic Resources, 2002)

Buck v. Bell:
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Buck_v._Bell

Buck v. Bell, 274 U.S. 200 (1927), is a decision of the United States Supreme Court, written by Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr., in which the Court ruled that a state statute permitting compulsory sterilization of the unfit, including the intellectually disabled, “for the protection and health of the state” did not violate the Due Process clause of the Fourteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution. The decision was largely seen as an endorsement of negative eugenics—the attempt to improve the human race by eliminating “defectives” from the gene pool. The Supreme Court has never expressly overturned Buck v. Bell.

(Read entire article here…)

Never forget…

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(All original portions of this work, by Rayn Kleipe, are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License, while all redistributed links, images, sounds, videos, and writings are protected under 17 U.S.C. § 107: Fair Use, or under Public Domain)

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